Dr. Scott Friedberg -  Board Certified Family Physician
The Flu & You
 
It is important to get vaccinated to prevent yourself from getting the flu.
What is the flu?
 
The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccine each year.
 
Signs and symptoms of flu:
 
People who have the flu often feel some or all of these signs and symptoms:
 
  • Fever* or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (very tired)
  • Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.
 
*It’s important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever.
 
Flu viruses are spread mainly from person to person through coughing or sneezing by people with influenza. Sometimes people may become infected by touching something – such as a surface or object – with flu viruses on it and then touching their mouth or nose.
What can I do to protect myself from getting sick?
 
Get vaccinated!  There are also everyday actions that can help prevent the spread of germs that cause respiratory illnesses like influenza.
 
Take these everyday steps to protect your health:
 
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze.  Alcohol-based hand cleaners* are also effective.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.  Germs spread this way.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities.  (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine).  Keep away from others as much as possible to keep from making others sick.
 
For more information,
click www.cdc.gov to visit the
Center for Disease Control's web site.